We have all heard the promise, “Download 1000+ winning email templates and convert leads in a flash.” A valiant sales pitch, but it rarely works out like that.

In fact you don’t need over a thousand templates – it’s too confusing, for you…and your customers.

So let’s dive in and discuss how we can learn from the influential tactics relayed in Robert B. Cialdini’s book, Persuasion, and how we can incorporate these into your email campaigns. The goal is to tap into Emotional Reasoning to create a KILLER email campaign!

These tactics can be customized and tailored to your products or services so your templates retain your brand’s identity rather than looking like another downloaded email template or blog page.

Here are three Free Sales Email Templates Your Clients Simply Can’t Resist.

Hack One : Reciprocation

 

The Old Give and Take…and Take

This theory suggests that our engagement is better when we are offered a little something “for free.” Psychologically, our guards drop if we first receive something for free, then we feel an overpowering expectation to give something back which overrides cognitive thinking. We become complicit to the desires or needs of the person who at first did the giving.

Think about it, we don’t like to sayno” to someone who has just given us something out of the kindness of their own heart.

Applying this to your email campaign will help you create a winning strategy. Offering something for free can be a great lead generation tool for building your audience and it can also be used to win more clients or re-engage clients who may have slipped away. This is why so many companies offer “free e-books,” “free-quotes” and “free SEO audits.

Industry Examples

  • Marketing Company, SEO Firm  – “Free SEO Audit”
  • Legal Firm – “Free consultation”
  • Gym, Personal Trailer – “Free Introduction session”

So how do you word these Hacks into your emails ?

SEO Firm  – Example

Hi Larissa,

 

The common phrase goes, “Where do businesses go to die? The second page of Google!”

 

Whilst not strictly true, there is a huge difference in the success of companies that rank higher in Google than those lost in the midst of search engine anonymity.

 

As specialists in SEO, I did a quick dive into your website and thought you would be interested in the results.

 

Attached is a quick review on the results – it’s all free from us JP SEO agency.  – (The Old Give and Take)

 

We like to give back, and this is our way of saying “Stick in there because there is a lot right with what you are doing (The friendly thief), but some tweaks will go a long way.”

 

I am available to chat if you have any queries you have about this report (and take).

 

Kind regards,

Chris at Tubular.io

 

Hack Two : The Friendly Thief

 

This emotional play emphasises that we are all humans who like and seek praise. It is a fact we are easily complimented and we are primed to be influenced by someone who gives us this admiration.

NB: Note that this tactic can backfire if the praise giver does not seem genuine or comes across as manipulative. Think of the smarmy salesman!

Practical Examples:

Selling to friends through interpersonal relationships. We purchase from people we like and trust. This is why homebound selling worked for companies like Tupperware in the 1990’s. I hate saying no to friends.

Hint – Give this tactic a modern day spin by mentioning names of mutual friends in the email.

Hi Larissa,

 

Despite us being in different circles, it appears our worlds do meet as your name came up in conversation with a mutual friend, David Handersen.

 

David is an old friend and ex-colleague of mine. We also did some design work for him. (You might have seen his new website!)

 

He mentioned you were looking for a brand refresh and said it would be a good idea for me to reach out to you. He was really happy with the quality and delivery of our work.

 

Do you have time to hop on a quick call this week ?

 

Thanks,

Chris 

 

Hack Three : Scarcity, The Rule of the Few

 

Picture this. You just ordered a drink at the bar and you are a quarter of the way through your current drink. Then the bartender says, “Last Call.”

Guess what – you buy drinks at last call even when you’ve already had enough. The last call has introduced a time restriction, a finite period of time which is a cue to us, the fun might stop. Whether you want or need another drink, you inevitably end up buying one.

Cialdini concludes that scarcity hinders our ability to think.

Hint – Trying to incorporate time based scarcity into an offer is a challenge when your email is a request to get in the door. It is hard to claim you are pressed for time (time-based scarcity) while sending cold emails. A good play would be to offer time-scarcity to current or retaining clients.

 

Industry Example

Hi Larissa,

 

How is the new business going?

 

I am not sure if you know, but every year we hand pick four clients who can apply for 50% off our loyalty rewards programme. The first three places were provided to our platinum members, however, one slot has just opened up and my manager has said this can be offered out to our loyal silver members.

 

Would you be interested in accepting this invitation?

 

Kind regards,

Chris 

 

Writing, creating and managing your templates can take hours upon hours. Having a common identity, structure and method to your emails will be a winning factor in scaling your business.

This week, we are releasing a new feature within our email integration called “Templates”. It allows you to simply write sales emails, save them as templates, share them with your team and blueprint your winning strategy. No more copy and paste!

 

 

During April, we are offering all new subscribers our Pro and Enterprise tiers free customized templates. We’ll sit down with you and create the perfect cold email campaign for your business that you can use in Tubular.

Win-Win!

If you have specific questions, or want to hear about something related that I didn’t cover, add a comment and I’ll be happy to share more details.

Thanks for reading!

 


Posted on March 29, 2018 by Chris Miller